AJS Dissertation Completion Fellowships

The Dissertation Completion Fellowships encourage the timely completion of doctorates by the most promising graduate students in the field of Jewish Studies. Only students who are in the final stages of writing their dissertations and who display clear evidence of their ability to defend their dissertations by the end of the fellowship year are eligible to apply for this program.

Recipients receive up to $25,000 as well as complimentary registration for the AJS Annual Conference. The AJS Dissertation Completion Fellowships are awarded based on merit and need. Fellowship recipients must submit evidence of any additional funding, at which point the AJS fellowship amount may be reduced to account for these extra funds. This fellowship thus serves as a “top-off” award for recipients with additional funding. Recipients without any other funding are eligible to receive $25,000, the full amount of the award.


OpenEdition suggests that you cite this post as follows:
Andreas Lehnertz (August 30, 2023). AJS Dissertation Completion Fellowships. medievalJewishStudiesNow! Retrieved July 18, 2024 from https://doi.org/10.58079/ri6n


About Andreas Lehnertz

As a Juniorprofessor of Medieval History specializing in Jewish History at Trier University, I delve into the intricate tapestry of social, cultural, and religious European history. My academic pursuits are centered around the nuanced dynamics of daily Christian-Jewish relations, the exploration of marginal Hebrew and Yiddish charter notes, the study of Jewish as well as general sealing practices, and the profound examination of Jewish craftspeople. I wrote a book about "Jewish Seals in the Medieval German Empire: The Authentication and Self-Representation of Jewish Men and Women" (in German). My expertise has been further honed through my roles as a postdoctoral fellow in the ERC project "Beyond the Elite – Jewish Daily Life in Medieval Europe" at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem and as a member of the Martin Buber Society in the Humanities and Social Sciences, also at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. Currently, I am writing book that delves into the intriguing world of "Jewish Craftspeople in Medieval Ashkenaz." Through my research and publications, I aim to contribute meaningfully to the academic discourse surrounding medieval history, providing valuable insights into the rich tapestry of European history during this pivotal period.