Polonsky Fellowships (4 year), The Van Leer Jerusalem Institute

The Polonsky Academy at the Van Leer Jerusalem Institute will award up to seven Fellowships in the humanities or social sciences for up to four years, beginning October 1, 2024. The Fellowship offers an annual stipend of $40,000 and $2,000 for research and related expenses, and other benefits. Yearly renewal will be contingent upon demonstrated progress in research. Fellows are expected to be physically present at the Institute for consecutive years during the period of the award. Applications will be considered from those awarded a Ph.D. on or after October 1, 2019. The deadline for submission is December 15, 2023.

Online applications should include the following documents in English, in separate files: statement of research plans (3-5 pages, with title); summary of previous research (3 pages); one single-authored published article or equivalent unpublished work; curriculum vitae, including list of publications; complete contact information, including phone numbers, for three referees. 

Outstanding candidates will be invited for interviews on February 20-21, 2024 either in person or by videoconference.

The Polonsky Academy strives to promote diversity and encourages applicants from all backgrounds to apply.


OpenEdition suggests that you cite this post as follows:
Andreas Lehnertz (November 23, 2023). Polonsky Fellowships (4 year), The Van Leer Jerusalem Institute. medievalJewishStudiesNow! Retrieved July 18, 2024 from https://doi.org/10.58079/ri9o


About Andreas Lehnertz

As a Juniorprofessor of Medieval History specializing in Jewish History at Trier University, I delve into the intricate tapestry of social, cultural, and religious European history. My academic pursuits are centered around the nuanced dynamics of daily Christian-Jewish relations, the exploration of marginal Hebrew and Yiddish charter notes, the study of Jewish as well as general sealing practices, and the profound examination of Jewish craftspeople. I wrote a book about "Jewish Seals in the Medieval German Empire: The Authentication and Self-Representation of Jewish Men and Women" (in German). My expertise has been further honed through my roles as a postdoctoral fellow in the ERC project "Beyond the Elite – Jewish Daily Life in Medieval Europe" at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem and as a member of the Martin Buber Society in the Humanities and Social Sciences, also at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. Currently, I am writing book that delves into the intriguing world of "Jewish Craftspeople in Medieval Ashkenaz." Through my research and publications, I aim to contribute meaningfully to the academic discourse surrounding medieval history, providing valuable insights into the rich tapestry of European history during this pivotal period.